5 Quotes about Love and Marriage

Love Marriage Romance Hearts
Romantic Red Hearts

Although much has been said on the topics of love and marriage, sometimes nothing sums it up so succinctly than a good quote.

Short, sweet, and to the point, here are five lovely quotes that you can use on your wedding invitations or ceremony programs, include in readings, signage at your reception, or just as inspiration.

Love with Red Heart
Love with Red Heart

1. “Being deeply loved by someone gives you strength, while loving someone deeply gives you courage.” ~ Lao Tze

2. “Happy is the man who finds a true friend, and far happier is he who finds that true friend in his wife.” ~ Franz Schubert

3. “A good marriage is one which allows for change and growth in individuals and in the way they express their love.” ~ Pearl S. Buck

4. “Men always want to be a woman’s first love and women want to be a man’s last romance.” ~ Oscar Wilde

5. “A successful marriage is an edifice that must be built every day.” ~ Andre Maurois

Heart with Arrow
Hearts with Arrow

Be sure to share with us in the comments below other quotes on love and marriage that you particularly love.

Hearts, Joy, Love!
Jean

Need inspiration or ideas for your wedding? Contact me today at jean@weddingsfromtheheart.net or at 937-235-2586 or 937-581-3647!

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

Why We Do That – Origins of Popular Wedding Ceremony Traditions

A wedding ceremony is a wonderful event – a rite-of-passage full of ritual and symbolism.

Have you ever wondered where these rituals and practices come from and why we do these things? Then read on.

The White Wedding Gown

We can thank Queen Victoria for the tradition of wearing a white wedding gown. She was the first to wear a white satin and lace dress for her wedding to Prince Albert in 1840.

Colored gowns were common at the time as white fabric was considered impractical (hard to come by, and hard to keep clean). Many brides wore their “Sunday Best.”

Enter Queen Victoria. She had some beautiful lace that she wanted incorporated into her wedding gown. The final product was made of white satin. Although she wasn’t the first royal bride to wear a white gown, it was her choice of attire that caught on and inspired brides to be married in white.

Today, while most brides still opt for the white gown, it’s not unusual to see non-white wedding gowns. Vera Wang’s fall 2014 bridal collection featured various shades of pink, including rose, coral and peony; and she also created bridal collections of red and black.

Bridesmaids Dressing Alike

Centuries ago, all of the women, including the bride, dressed alike, not just the bridesmaids. This was to confuse the evil spirits who lurked around. The evil spirits intended to cause harm and ill will to the bride. Since everyone was dressed the same, the evil spirits couldn’t tell who was the bride, and so were unable to cause any harm or mischief.

The Ceremony Processional

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The ceremony starts with the processional, the formal entering of the wedding party.

Many couples have only the bride’s attendants walk in during the processional (with the groom’s attendants coming out with the groom and officiant), however having the entire wedding party enter as couples is perfectly acceptable. It’s your preference.

The processional dates back hundreds of years ago when a wedding ceremony was preceded by dancing (celebrating the joy of life) to the ceremony locale. Through the years the dancing evolved into the modern processional.

With This Ring

 

 

 

 

 

 

During the ceremony, couples exchange wedding rings.

The practice of exchanging wedding rings dates back thousands of years to the Romans, Egyptians, and Greeks.

The symbolism of the wedding ring originated with the Egyptians. A ring is round, with no beginning and no end. It represents eternity and the never-ending love of the couple.

In ancient Rome and Greece, wedding rings were used to represent a promise of fidelity.

Sealed With A Kiss

Who can forget the kiss when the couple are pronounced husband and wife? We can thank the Ancient Romans for this as they sealed contracts with a kiss. Also, it was believed that as a couple kiss, their breath intermingles, therefore giving each other a little bit of their souls.

Decorating The Getaway Car

 

 

 

 

 

Tying shoes to the back of the getaway car dates back to ancient Assyrian, Hebrew and Egyptian cultures where exchanging shoes sealed an agreement or contract.

Tin cans were later used although it is unclear as to when this practice began). It was thought that the clanking sound would scare away any evil spirits.

If you’re looking for fun ideas or help with your wedding plans, contact me today at jean@weddingsfromtheheart.net or at 937-235-2586 or 937-581-3647!

Hearts, Joy, Love!
Jean

Follow my blog with Bloglovin.

Photo Credits:

Queen Victoria – unknown

Bridesmaid walking down aisle, and
Bride and father walking down aisle
Jeff Schaefer

Stargazer lily with rings, and
First kiss
Sandra Reed

Bride with bridesmaids,
Wedding party lined up for processional, and
Decorated vehicle
Weddings From The Heart

Why You Need a Rehearsal for Your Wedding Ceremony

 

 

 

 

 

 

Every now and then we come across a couple who doesn’t think they need a rehearsal.

Maybe it’s because they’ve been in several friends’weddings as bridesmaids or groomsmen, they think they can skip a rehearsal for their ceremony. They are convinced that everyone can just show up on the big day and everything will go fine.

If you are considering skipping a rehearsal think of it this way – you are about to produce, direct and star in a major production. No Broadway show (no matter how professional the actors) goes live without weeks of rehearsal.

Your wedding ceremony should not either. Ok, your ceremony doesn’t need weeks of rehearsal, but it does need a rehearsal.

Of course there are always exceptions to the rule. If you are having a very simple ceremony, (with no attendants, no readers, no aisle runner), and a small guest list (25 – 50 people), then you probably can get away without doing a rehearsal.

But for everyone else, do a rehearsal! This will ensure that all participants are familiar and comfortable with their roles. And since they all know what they are supposed to be doing, things will go smoothly on the wedding day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Who Should Be at the Rehearsal?

• The bride and groom (obviously!)
• The wedding party
• Parents of the happy couple
• Parents of the flower girl and ring bearer
• Everyone else directly involved in the ceremony – this includes ushers, readers, and vocalists

If they have an active part in your ceremony, they need to be at the rehearsal so there’s no confusion, and they’ll know when and how they are to go about with their part.

Other Rehearsal Details to be Covered Include:

• Who will sit in the first pew/row and in any reserved sections
• Who will roll out the aisle runner (and when)
• Who will escort in the mother of the groom and the mother of the bride (and if they will be lighting a unity candle)
• Where readers are to sit, and when they are to rise and stand to do their reading
• When candle lighters are to light the candles
• Any additions to the ceremony such as a sand ceremony or unity candle

What to Practice During the Rehearsal?

I often say the rehearsal lets everyone know how to get from Point A to Point B (then back again), and what to do in-between.

Your rehearsal should include:

• Seating of the mother of the groom and mother of the bride
• The Processional
• When and where for the wedding party to stand/sit during the ceremony
• Readings
• Unity Candle/Sand Ceremony/Etc.
• The Recessional

At one time brides chose a stand in for the rehearsal thinking it was unlucky for her to actually say any of the words of the ceremony before the actual event. Today, some officiants prefer not to rehearse the entire ceremony, but instead practice only the entrance (processional), exit (recessional), and just do a brief walk through the sequence of events and vows. Check with your officiant ahead of time so you’ll know what to expect for your rehearsal.

Don’t worry, the officiant will cue the couple and wedding party during the actual ceremony, so no one has to be concerned about memorizing anything and remembering what needs to be done when.

What NOT to Do At Your Rehearsal

Don’t practice for hours – The main idea of the rehearsal is for participants to know how to get from Point A to Point B (how to enter), where to stand, then how to exit. There is no need to practice this over and over.

Don’t try to be the one in charge and run the rehearsal yourself – Your officiant and wedding planner have done this before, and have been closely working with you for your wedding. They know how you want things to be. Let them take care of the rehearsal. Remember, you won’t have time to be “in charge” on the wedding day, as you will be busy just by being the bride (or groom).

Don’t plan on a processional that will last longer than the ceremony itself – This is a sure fire way to turn something into a production, and to take away from the meaning and sanctity of what is about to occur (your wedding ceremony).

Don’t make any major additions or changes to your ceremony – By the time of your rehearsal, all decisions should be made. The rehearsal is a time to practice what has been planned for, with maybe a few minor tweaks.

Photo credit (wedding party with bride and groom): Weddings From The Heart

Photo credit (Flower girl and ring bearer): 554T9994 via photopin (license)

Hearts, Joy, Love!
Jean

Follow my blog with Bloglovin.

To see how Weddings From The Heart can make your wedding day stress-free, enjoyable, and just the way you want, contact me at 937-235-2586, 937-581-3647, or jean@weddingsfromtheheart.net and schedule your free, initial appointment!

Why Your Wedding Planner Needs To Be At Your Ceremony Rehearsal

Came across an inquiry for a wedding planner. For the planning services requested, the bride-to-be checked off yes for “ceremony,” yes for “reception,” and no for “wedding rehearsal.”

Ladies, you may think you’ll save some money if your planner doesn’t have to be at the rehearsal. But IT IS IMPERATIVE that anyone involved with the ceremony to also be at the rehearsal.

Sure, you’ll discuss with your planner in great detail the way you want the ceremony to be, the order that the wedding party will go down the aisle, if there will be a unity candle, what songs will be played for the processional . . .

But, things can change. And even the slightest change can throw things off IF THE PLANNER WAS NOT AT THE REHEARSAL!

What could possibly be changed?

  • The order of the wedding party is different than what the couple decided at first
  • Programs will be passed out (when originally there were none)
  • The bride’s processional song is different than what she initially chose
  • An aisle runner has been added
  • There won’t be a unity candle (or sand ceremony or the like)

Can you imagine what would happen if any of the above occurred at the rehearsal, and the planner wasn’t there?

There would be confusion, and the likelihood that something would not go right.

In over 20 years as a professional planner, I have never left a wedding rehearsal and had absolutely no changes or updates to be made to the timeline. Sometimes the changes were minimal and minor. Other times the ceremony timeline had major revisions.

A couple years ago, I was told that I didn’t have to come to the rehearsal. There ceremony site was a bit of a drive, and she didn’t want me to have to make the trip two days in a row.

A very kind gesture. But, I explained to her that yes, I will definitely be (and have to be) at the rehearsal. Although I have done hundreds of wedding ceremonies, I have not done YOUR ceremony.

Being at the rehearsal ensures that all of my information is up to date, any last minute questions are answered, your wedding party knows who I am, and I will know the “lay of the land” if it is at a venue I haven’t been to before.

Hearts, Joy, Love!
Jean

Photo credit: The Bride via photopin

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

If you’re looking for fun ideas, or need help with your wedding plans Weddings From The Heart can help. Contact me today at jean@weddingsfromtheheart.net or at 937-235-2586 or 937-581-3647!

Meet the Pros – Interview with Rev. Cindy Lee Carver

1. Tell us a bit about yourself.

I am a minister of 20+ years. Over the years, I noticed that rent-a-minister, now called off site minister or wedding officiant more difficult to find, especially those who specialize in alternative, CosPlay, non-traditional, and LGBT weddings.

Often I’m asked about my religious affiliation, which is indigenous. Indigenous often times means Native American. I’m Métis (May-tee) which is a Canadian recognized First Nations People. In the United States we are non-federal recognized Native American. If you are interested in an authentic Eastern Woodland style wedding, it would be my pleasure to help you plan and execute it with all the fine details. My non-denominational training is that of a Spiritualist, making my abilities very adaptable for your wedding ceremony.

2. How did you get into officiating for wedding ceremonies?

My mother and daughters told me to put up a website and offer my non-traditional services. After that, I added traditional services and began answering emails and telephone calls. I’m glad I did it. I enjoy the smiles, the love that shines in their eyes when they look at each other or talk about one another, and the vows are amazing.

3. What is your favorite part of a wedding ceremony?

The vows. Whether I write them or the couple write their own, the emotion that overwhelms them as they gaze into each others eyes is wonderful. We think of the Mothers of the couple as the people with tears in their eyes. But, the couple often have their own tears, choke up while trying to speak, or taking laughing fits. This is the part I adore, their emotion bubbling outward.

4. Are you seeing any new trends for wedding ceremonies, and if so, what are they?

CosPlay and Off beat themes are more popular now, than any other time in history. My blog contains photos of the Halloween themes and Steampunk from 2014. I’m continue to wait for the photos from other wedding couples. 2015 weddings have included CosPlay as the Penguin from the game, Arkham Asylum, Off Beat as a Steampunk clockmaker. 2016 is gearing up for a totally Dr. Who wedding and I’ll dress as the very first Doctor.

The photos I still wait for are the Penguin, a couple of the steampunk weddings, along with me as a Plainswalker. Often Rule 63 is invoked when I officiate a CosPlay wedding.

5. What is your favorite venue and why?

For Steampunk, I like the Boonshoft Museum Space Theater. For CosPlay any outdoor venue. For more of a Masquerade style or a traditional wedding, I like The Event Connection. I look forward to officiating a wedding at the Dayton Art Institute and The Victoria Theater.

6. What are some of your top tips for a stress-free wedding ceremony?

Design an itinerary and stick to it. Develop your itinerary with your wedding planner or your day of the event coordinator, officiant, and DJ. Let the people you hire do their jobs. When you try to micro-manage it over stresses your emotions and it gets overwhelming fast, so allow the people you hire to do their jobs.

7. If you could officiate at any celebrity wedding (past, present or future), who would be the lucky couple?

Ellen DeGeneres and Portia de Rossi, I admire Mrs. DeGeneres’ go-give attributes and her natural ability to be entertaining. Brooke Elliott for the confidence she exudes. Bruce Campbell in case he would like to show up as one of his many characters. My list continues on.

8. Anything else you want to share with us?

Every wedding couple should get contracts from each vendor they hire. Whether it is a minister or a friend of the family. Contracts are the glue that provides you with peace of mind that you are hiring a professional that will have a backup plan if something would happen and they could not honor their agreement. I have a network of associate ministers that will deliver your ceremonial service if I am in the emergency room.

The second part of the contract issue is to make sure there is not a non-disparagement clause. A Non-Disparagement clause restricts a person from writing a negative review. In simple non legalese, it means you can not write on facebook, or other social media about how so and so didn’t hold up the contract with you.

While you have hired your vendors, it is polite to offer them a monetary tip the day of the event or in a thank you card the week after to let them know you appreciated their hard work on your behalf.

You can contact Rev. Cindy Lee at
937- 985-7956
Email cindylee@revcindylee.com
Website http://revcindylee.com/

Nina’s Hidden Gardens – An Elegant Garden Venue

I’d like to introduce Nina Griffin and Nina’s Hidden Gardens, a new wedding and special event venue, conveniently located in Beavercreek, Ohio.

Nina’s Hidden Gardens, is a tranquil setting that will provide a memorable locale for your special event, including wedding ceremonies and receptions, showers, family reunions, and corporate events. Nina says whether you’re looking to have a rustic backdrop or a formal setting, she can accommodate both.

Her English heritage lends itself to the enjoyment of cottage gardens and spending time outside communing with nature, and you can enjoy several different areas for your special event, including:

The Scenic Pond

Walled Garden with Stone Steps

Poolside with Terraced Seating
Or bring in a tent on the spacious grounds.

The sense of peace and intimate tranquil setting is a rare find only three miles from the mall in Beavercreek.

“I want to share the pleasure of this lovely setting with those who also appreciate the elegance yet rustic nature and calming influence this unique retreat has to offer. Whether it be a wedding or a small event you will experience that sense of joy that I find here every day.”                                                              ~ Nina

Visit Nina’s website at Nina’s Hidden Gardens for more photos of this beautiful venue, and be sure to contact her at 937-271-1609 or by email at ninamgriffin@yahoo.com and see how Nina’s Hidden Gardens can be the perfect setting for your wedding or special event.

Walk This WayAlternatives to Traditional Processional Songs

Wagner’s “Bridal Chorus” (aka “Here Comes The Bride”) is a traditional choice for your walk down the aisle at your wedding ceremony. However, it isn’t for everyone. Luckily there are several fun alternative song choices for your walk down the aisle. Here are a few:

“You Are So Beautiful” by Joe Cocker

“Ribbon In The Sky” by Stevie Wonder

“Something” by The Beatles

“One Hand, One Heart” from West Side Story

“Breathe” by Faith Hill

What other songs do you think would be perfect processional music?

Photo credit: Michael Ireland

Hearts, Joy, Love!
Jean

If you have questions or are looking for fun ideas, Weddings From The Heart can help. Contact me at 937-235-2586 or 937-581-3647 or at jean@weddingsfromtheheart.net.

The Top 6 Wedding Planning Mistakes Couples Make

To help make the planning (and pre-planning) stages of your wedding day go smoother and less stressful, keep these 6 simple tips in mind.

# 1: Making Plans Too Soon After the Engagement

 

 

 

 

 

 

photo credit: springsandra via photopin cc

Weddings are an exciting time, and I get that. When you become engaged you’re excited to get started with all of the fun of planning your big day.

But some couples jump in too soon. As soon as they get engaged, some couples start pouring through wedding magazines, surfing the internet for wedding planning websites, sifting through Pinterest and creating a “My Wedding Day” pin board . . .

Believe me, you will have plenty of time to do all that and more, but for right now . . .

Enjoy being engaged!

Show off your ring. Relish being a fiancee. There’s time for the planning.

When couples jump in and start planning too quickly, they often overlook things such as a budget, or even sitting down with each other to discuss how they both envision and what they want for their wedding day.

You want all of the components of your wedding day – your dress, your flowers, your venue, and everything else – to coordinate and work together. Diving in too soon and you may end up with a mish-mosh. Also, if you start with a budget in place, you’ll know what you can afford, and end up getting the things you really want.

Make a game plan first – then start planning.

# 2: Not Having a Rain Plan

 

 

 

 

 

photo credit: John_Wright via photopin cc

If you are planning an outdoor ceremony or reception, it’s an absolute must to take into consideration the possibility that Mother Nature won’t be cooperative.

While it’s so easy to hope for sunny skies, or assume that it “just can’t possibly rain on my wedding day,” you have to be realistic.

Have a “Plan B” in place – rent a tent or a small indoor venue, have several umbrellas available (perfect for rain or too much sun).

# 3: Assuming That an Outdoor Tent Reception Will Be Cheaper and Easier

 

 

 

 

 

 

Too often I’ve heard people say “I’m going to have a tent in the backyard to save money.”

In reality, with a tent reception, there is usually more that needs to be taken care of. Think of it this way, you are literally “building” a reception venue where none existed before.

Most homes aren’t already equipped to handle 100+ people so you may need to rent such things as: generators, restrooms, lighting, fans or AC units, heaters, and trash cans.

# 4: Misjudging the Size (and Capacity) of the Venue

You’ll have to ask yourself, “Although the venue has a maximum capacity of 200, will all 200 of my guests really be comfortable?”

Will everyone be able to easily see the goings-on of the evening, or will some be stuck behind a pillar, or (worse yet!) in another room entirely?

Will there be enough space between tables for guests and wait staff to easily maneuver, or will things be tight? cozy is one thing. Feeling like you’re packed in a sardine can is another.

No one wants to feel like they can’t move about without knocking into something or someone. Plan accordingly so your guests enjoy a wedding that is fun and elegant, not crunched and unpleasant.

# 5: Misjudging the Timing for Your Outdoor Ceremony

 

 

 

 

 

 

photo credit: alémdoquesevê_ via photopin cc

Outdoor ceremonies are beautiful. There’s nothing like celebrating amid nature – the flowers, green grass, lovely ponds . . . The scenery and landscape of outdoor sites can’t be beat!

Unless the bright sun is shining directly into your guests eyes, or it’s gotten so dark that they can’t see beyond the row in front of them.

If possible, go to your ceremony venue at a similar time of day (and similar time of year) as your wedding day to see where the sun is located.

TimeandDate.com is a wonderful resource as it can tell you precisely what time sunset will occur on your wedding day, as well as the sun’s position in the sky.

# 6: Forgetting Why You’re Having a Wedding

 

 

 

photo credits, left to right: torbakhopper HE DEAD via photopin cc, erin m via photopin cc, murilocardoso via photopin cc, kristaguenin via photopin cc, cheriejoyful via photopin cc

With all of the details involved in planning a wedding, it’s easy to get so wrapped up in the “wedding” that you forget about what’s really important.

Yes, you want all of your plans and hard work to go exactly they way you’ve envisioned it to be. But this is real life, and sometimes little hitches pop up – the flowers in your bouquet aren’t the right shade of pink, the dj plays the wrong song during intros, there are soggy patches under the tent from the rain storm the night before.

But . . . regardless of everything else, you are marrying the love of your life so keep your focus on celebrating the joy and love you have!

To see how Weddings From The Heart can make your wedding day stress-free, enjoyable, and just the way you want, contact me at 937-235-2586, 937-581-3647, or jean@weddingsfromtheheart.net and schedule your free, initial appointment!

Hearts, Joy, Love!
Jean

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

 

8 Simple Tips to Writing Your Own Wedding Vows

photo credit: emraps via photopin cc
As a special way to make their wedding uniquely theirs, more and more couples are writing their own wedding vows. If that is in your plans, here are some things to keep in mind.

*This can be a huge undertaking. It is like being an author/poet and public speaker at the same time. Some people can pull it off and others can’t. Think about it clearly before you commit to making it an integral part of your ceremony.

*Make sure it’s even possible. Many churches don’t allow personalized vows. Couples are required to recite a specific and traditional set of vows. Even officiants who OK the concept may want to have final approval of what you have chosen to say.

*Start early. You may have learned to cram for finals in college, but this is not the time or place to just “jot down a few ideas the night before and wing it.”

photo credit: joshandlucinda via photopin cc
*Make sure that both of you are on the same page. The bride may have something serious and somber in mind, while the groom is thinking funny and light. Talk about the tone of the vows that will work for both of you. Pick a common theme to guide you both. Consider this – do you want to know what he/she will say before the ceremony or is it to be a surprise?

*Feel free to copy words or ideas from books or plays. Quote a famous poet or author whose work resonates with you.

*Remember what the point of a wedding vow is. It is a solemn promise, a verbal contract if you will. Don’t make the vows so personal that no one knows what you are talking about – this is not the time or place for “inside jokes.”

*Don’t go on and on and on. . . Time how long it takes to say your vows, and adjust accordingly. One minute or so is usually enough.

*Practice, practice, practice. (But remember that it is OK to read your vows so you don’t have to memorize them).

For more wedding planning tips & ideas, contact me at jean@weddingsfromtheheart.net or at 937-235-2586.

Hearts, Joy, Love!
Jean